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Loretta Lynch sworn in as new US attorney general

Loretta Lynch was sworn in Monday as the 83rd U.S. attorney general, becoming the first African-American woman to serve as the nation's top law enforcement official. She said her confirmation as attorney general showed that "we can do anything" and pledged to deal with cyberattacks and other threats facing the country. "We can restore trust and faith both in our laws and those who enforce them," Lynch said, an apparent reference to ongoing efforts to repair relations between police departments and minority communities. Vice President Joe Biden administered the oath of office to Lynch at a Justice Department ceremony. Lynch replaces Eric Holder, who left the job Friday after six years as attorney general.

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Baltimore city employee sues after Islamic-law marriage not recognized

A Baltimore city employee and observant Muslim has filed suit against his employer for not recognizing his Islamic-law marriage, which he says has left his pregnant wife without health care. Idris Abdus-Shahid and Baiyina Jones were married 17 years ago in a religious ceremony but never obtained a civil marriage license before they were married, according to the lawsuit, filed Thursday in Baltimore City Circuit Court.

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High court to consider lawsuits over personal data

The Supreme Court said Monday it will decide whether Web sites and other firms that collect personal data can be sued for publishing inaccurate information even if the mistakes don't cause any actual harm. The case is being watched closely by Google, Facebook and other Internet companies concerned that class-action lawsuits under the Fair Credit Reporting Act could expose them to billions of dollars in damages. The justices will hear an appeal from Spokeo.com, an Internet search engine that compiles publicly available data on people and lets subscribers view the information, including address, age, marital status and economic health.

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Supreme Court clears way for $15M lawsuit against Baltimore Police

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday cleared the way for a man to pursue a $15 million lawsuit against the Baltimore Police Department and three of its officers, alleging that their unconstitutional withholding of exculpatory evidence from his 1988 trial led to him serving 20 years in prison for murder before DNA tests helped bring his freedom.

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L.A. firm displaces DLA Piper in Am Law 100

Since its inception in 1985, American Lawyer's Am Law 100 rankings of the nation's 100 top-grossing law firms have been dominated by three firms: Baker & McKenzie, DLA Piper and Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom. In an unprecedented shift, DLA Piper has been displaced in the 2015 rankings, released Monday and available at www.americanlawyer.com. The new kid on the block: Los Angeles-based Latham & Watkins, thanks to an increase in revenue of more than 14 percent, to $2.6 billion, the most revenue ever accrued by a single Am Law 100 law firm. Average revenue per lawyer at the 100 top-grossing firms? $871,958, up 3.7 percent.

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Group claims Balt. Co. picks for judicial nominating commission not diverse enough

Group claims Balt. Co. picks for judicial nominating commission not diverse enough

Gov. Larry Hogan has yet to appoint a judge in any state court, but who might be helping him vet candidates in Baltimore County has raised concerns. The Women's Law Center of Maryland, in a letter written last week, asked the governor to remand nominations for the county's Trial Court Judicial Nominating Commission because all four people are white men.

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Severna Park H.S. wins mock-trial crown

Severna Park H.S. wins mock-trial crown

Amid echoes of Ferguson, Mo., high-school students from Severna Park and Cumberland battled Friday in the mock trial of a fictional police officer accused of shooting an unarmed 18-year-old man to death without justification. With his team cast as the prosecution, Severna Park High School student Cory Jeweler said in his opening statement that Michael Case’s arms were raised in surrender when officer Darren Gray fired nine shots into him on a warm, clear day last August. “It is the police officer’s duty to protect and serve,” Jeweler said to start the championship round of the statewide High School Mock Trial Competition. “Gray didn’t protect and serve anyone. He pulled out his gun and pulled the trigger.”

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Book celebrates evolution of women attorneys in Maryland

Book celebrates evolution of women attorneys in Maryland

When Belva Lockwood was denied admission to the Carroll County bar in 1881, a county judge wrote in his decision that women were equipped “as little for the judicial conflicts of the court-room, as for the physical conflicts of the battlefield.” Fast forward 134 years: Lockwood’s history, along with the tales of generations of other women attorneys in Maryland, make up a newly released book called Finding Justice. The project was sponsored by the Maryland Women’s Bar Association Foundation and spearheaded by Court of Appeals Judge Lynne A. Battaglia, who named Lockwood’s story as one of the highlights of the work.

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Family of girl injured on slide at Maryland Zoo files suit

The family of a Forest Hill elementary school student who allegedly suffered a fractured skull during a 2013 field trip to The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore has filed suit against the institution. Lindsay Shank went down a 12-foot-high slide backwards and head-first and struck her head on a protective surface that was only two-inches thick atop the concrete, according to the lawsuit, filed Wednesday in Baltimore City Circuit Court.

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