Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility

The lost art of handwriting

When was the last time you sent someone a handwritten note—not an office memo or an email, but an actual handwritten note, just because?

According to The Cincinnati Enquirer, at least 41 states no longer require public school students to learn cursive. Schools are now prioritizing computer and keyboarding skills over handwriting. Is it possible that with the constant rise of technology, handwriting is a lost art, no longer required by our society?

CournutIn our opinion, it doesn’t have to be. As a marketing and PR firm, we constantly emphasize the importance of not only building a brand for your business but also a brand for yourself, or a personal brand. Handwritten notes and handwriting style undoubtedly play a role in how your personal brand is perceived.

Your connections—clients, acquaintances and friends—will feel more appreciated when you include a personal touch, such as a handwritten thank you note. While a typed note or email can be duplicated and sent to the masses, a handwritten note must be tailored to each recipient and requires more attention, making it seem that much more thoughtful. I met a woman last year who actually has a box where she places any handwritten note she receives as a memento because handwritten notes are so rare. Every so often she goes through the box and reads the notes and letters.

We’re making it our goal to send more handwritten notes in 2014, whether in the form of invitations, thank you notes or just dropping a line. It is a great way to follow up, and people will perceive you as more caring and personable.

Next time you go to send a “thank you” or “how are you?” email, ask yourself if a handwritten note could take its place. Start by buying a new set of cards and writing out holiday thank you notes! An attractive envelope that arrives via postal mail is a lot more memorable than an email or text message that is likely to get lost in a cluttered inbox and quickly deleted and forgotten.