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Timeout

Sometimes you just have to put yourself in timeout.  I was drowning in work, my wedding was approaching in December, I was renovating my house, and I had all of these other commitments (MSBA, book club, this blog). I had friends who needed help painting their new house and siblings who were looking for babysitters. I was trying to do it all and it was taking a toll. I had this looming feeling of guilt mixed with failure, like I was doing a lot, but none of it particularly well.

I was tired of committing and then having to back out at the last minute. I felt horrible when I didn’t get my blog written, even though I had every intention of doing it.

Reduce Speed NowI knew I had to put a few things on hold. If nothing else, I owed it to those around me to let them know ahead of time that I was not going to be able to keep my commitment.

I let the Daily Record know that I needed a slight break but that I’d be interested in resuming blogging in January. I talked to the Chair of the YLS at the MSBA and explained that I wouldn’t be able to make any meetings or events until January. I limited my time to focusing on work and the wedding.

We’re often over-achievers, we young lawyers. As if our billable hours requirement aren’t enough to keep us busy, we often feel this overwhelming urge to take on more and more–and feel like we’re failing if it all just becomes too much.

I wouldn’t have forgiven myself if I became too burned out to truly experience and enjoy my wedding and honeymoon. I couldn’t let my work suffer. Everything else, while important, had to wait. It was the best choice I could have made.

I got back into the office today from my honeymoon. I felt recharged and refreshed. I RSVP’d for the YLS section meeting tonight and offered to bring something to book club tomorrow night. I’m writing this blog!

No one was mad at me; no one kicked me out of the club. In fact, I was met with support and enthusiasm.

Take it from this young lawyer: it’s okay to wave the white flag from time-to-time. It’s okay to say it’s too much. It’s okay to hit pause.