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A situation and a Situtation both involving fake tans

Time flies when you’re fist-pumping.

It was approximately five summers ago that eight people descended on Seaside Heights, N.J., to create television history. “Jersey Shore” is well on its way to becoming pop culture nostalgia (if it’s not already there) but my ears always perk up when one of the cast members is in the news.

Unfortunately for Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino, it’s not good news this time, as he was charged earlier this week with assaulting his brother at a tanning salon they co-own.

Sorrentino was seen leaving the Middletown police station Tuesday afternoon after posting bond, smiling and with a black eye. The Associated Press notes the timing of the arrest is interesting because Sorrentino is “due to return to reality television this summer in the TV Guide Network’s ‘The Sorrentinos,’ which will follow his family as they try to open their own tanning salon.”

The AP story also has the best opening sentence: “It was gym, tan, jail for The Situation as he was arrested Tuesday after a fight at a tanning salon.”

Speaking of tanning, bronze is the preferred color for many beauty pageant contestants. And we’ve got a developing situation with the newly crowned Miss USA, Nia Sanchez.

Sanchez became the first pageant winner from Nevada on June 8. Days later, FoxNews.com, citing a “well-placed source,” said Sanchez did not even live in Nevada. Sanchez has denied the accusation and said she lives in a house in Las Vegas with a friend.

But Norm Clarke of The Las Vegas Review-Journal reported Sunday that a search of various public record databases yielded two addresses for Sanchez, both in California.

Nevada competition guidelines, according to Clarke, call for contestants to provide two documents dated six months before the state pageant and be issued in the contestant’s name, such as voter ID or registration cards, tax returns, employment records, bank statements or leases and deeds.

This could end up being the biggest beauty pageant scandal since Miss Rhode Island’s doves were killed prior to the 1994 Miss America competition.