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In this July 17 photo, Capt. Kerry Harrington discusses the installation of cameras on his fishing boat, which the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has required since June, at the commercial harbor in West Ocean City. The technology allows the administration to verify what pelagic longline fishermen are reporting when it comes to things such as discarding dead fish. But to Harrington, it feels like Big Brother is watching. “You can imagine the intrusiveness of it,” he said. “Under the microscope all day long.” (Rachael Pacella/The Daily Times via AP)
In this July 17 photo, Capt. Kerry Harrington discusses the installation of cameras on his fishing boat, which the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has required since June, at the commercial harbor in West Ocean City. The technology allows the administration to verify what pelagic longline fishermen are reporting when it comes to things such as discarding dead fish. But to Harrington, it feels like Big Brother is watching. “You can imagine the intrusiveness of it,” he said. “Under the microscope all day long.” (Rachael Pacella/The Daily Times via AP)

Md. fishermen say camera requirement invades their privacy

OCEAN CITY — When the longline on the Sea Born is engaged, which is most of the time when it's out in the Atlantic, two video cameras record everything on the deck and side of the boat. The cameras look familiar, black half-orbs like the ones commonly seen taking security footage. But they're not at a ...

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