Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility

Take a tour of the Baltimore City Detention Center

BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
Slide 19
Slide 19
Slide 19
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
Slide 21
Slide 21
Slide 21
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour
BCDC Tour

 

The dark, cramped hallways of the now-closed Baltimore City Detention Center are lined with dirty cells and walls with layers of peeling paint — but the detainees that used to occupy the jail’s narrow bunks have cleared out and moved to other facilities in the city.

“It’s obvious why we closed that part of the jail,” said Stephen T. Moyer, secretary of the state Department of Public Safety & Correctional Services. “This building needed to go. After the fifth time I came through here, I could barely stomach it.”

Gov. Larry Hogan announced in July the closure of the men’s detention center at the BCDC, which houses pretrial detainees and inmates serving sentences of 18 months or less, citing the dismal living conditions in the Civil War-era building. The last detainees were transferred this week to other facilities.

Reporters, including Daily Record photographer Maximilian Franz, were taken on a tour of the BCDC on Thursday, along with the neighboring women’s detention center and the Baltimore Central Booking and Intake Center.

 


About Lauren Kirkwood

Lauren Kirkwood covers the business of law beat at The Daily Record.