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In this Oct. 29 photograph, Billie Fisher stands in an industrial area of Camden, N.J., as she talks about being given the drug naloxone a couple years ago, to reverse a heroin overdose.  Fisher said after being given the drug, she was in an emergency room in painful withdrawal.  Naloxone works most of the time, but national statistics aren’t kept on what happens to people who are revived. Some overdose again soon afterward. Some get treatment and get clean, but limited insurance, high costs and a shortage of spots at treatment centers can be hurdles. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
In this Oct. 29 photograph, Billie Fisher stands in an industrial area of Camden, N.J., as she talks about being given the drug naloxone a couple years ago, to reverse a heroin overdose. Fisher said after being given the drug, she was in an emergency room in painful withdrawal. Naloxone works most of the time, but national statistics aren’t kept on what happens to people who are revived. Some overdose again soon afterward. Some get treatment and get clean, but limited insurance, high costs and a shortage of spots at treatment centers can be hurdles. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

Recovery after overdoses: Stopping heroin’s ‘revolving door’

CAMDEN, N.J. — It's a truth addicts and health providers know well: Naloxone can reverse heroin overdoses, but it can't cure the addictions that cause them. In a small but growing number of places, people who land in hospitals after being revived by the drug are being guided toward long-term treatment. That's largely because decision makers ...

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