Quantcast
This undated handout photo provided by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office shows the StingRay II, manufactured by Harris Corporation, of Melbourne, Fla., a cellular site simulator used for surveillance purposes. A police officer testified Wednesday that the Baltimore Police Department has used Hailstorm, a upgraded version of the StringRay surveillance device, 4,300 times and believes it is under orders by the U.S. government to withhold evidence from criminal trials and ignore subpoenas in cases where the device is used. (AP Photo/U.S. Patent and Trademark Office)
This undated handout photo provided by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office shows the StingRay II, manufactured by Harris Corporation, of Melbourne, Fla., a cellular site simulator used for surveillance purposes. A police officer testified Wednesday that the Baltimore Police Department has used Hailstorm, a upgraded version of the StringRay surveillance device, 4,300 times and believes it is under orders by the U.S. government to withhold evidence from criminal trials and ignore subpoenas in cases where the device is used. (AP Photo/U.S. Patent and Trademark Office)

Md. appeals court rules against Stingray cellphone-surveillance device

BALTIMORE — A Maryland appeals court says a clandestine cellphone-surveillance device used by Baltimore police in an attempted murder case violates the Fourth Amendment and any evidence collected using it must be excluded. The Court of Special Appeals issued the order Wednesday in the case of Kerron Andrews, who was charged with attempted murder in Baltimore ...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*