Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility

JLL named Harbor Point exclusive office broker

Beatty Development Group has tapped JLL as the exclusive office broker for its $1 billion Harbor Point development. (File)

Beatty Development Group has tapped JLL as the exclusive office broker for its $1 billion Harbor Point development. (File)

Beatty Development Group has tapped JLL as the exclusive office broker for its $1 billion Harbor Point development.

The 3 million-square-foot, mixed-use development along Baltimore’s Inner Harbor will include 1.6 million square feet of Class A office space.

JLL’s focus will be to land an anchor tenant for the 220,000 square feet of office space at Wills Wharf. That building will also include a 156-room Hilton Canopy Hotel with views of the Inner Harbor.

Mark Levy, JLL’s greater Baltimore market director, was not immediately available for comment. But in a news release, he praised the city and depicted this as an opportunity to show off the city’s assets.

“Baltimore is a world-class city with a dynamic, highly educated workforce drawn to the city’s resurging live/work/play environment coupled with some of the most important educational and cultural assets in the country,” Levy said.

JLL has been on a roll in recent months, landing deals in some of the area’s largest development projects.

In June, what’s now known as Tradepoint Atlantic named JLL the exclusive broker for the redevelopment of Sparrows Point from declining steel mill into a maritime, manufacturing, warehousing, logistics and retail hub in Baltimore County.

The firm’s role in Harbor Point, home of the 23-story Exelon Building that will be the headquarters for Exelon Constellation Business Unit, is another high-profile assignment for the firm.

Beatty broke ground early this year on the 17-story apartment building at 1405 Pointe St., which will also include 18,000 square feet of ground level retail.

Harbor Point has been one of the more controversial development proposals in Baltimore.

The plan came under fire for the amount of incentives Beatty received, which included $107 million in tax increment financing for the project.

There’s also been concern that the new office space will pull tenants from the city’s traditional business district that is struggling to find tenants, especially west of Charles Street.

Environmental hazards at the site also created concerns from residents who live near the site.

Harbor Point is being built on an area that has been exposed to chromium, dating back to the 1890s, when the Baltimore Chrome Facility started operating at the site.

Former property owner Allied Signal, which later became Honeywell, signed a consent decree with the EPA to clean up the property.

As part of the cleanup a cap was placed on the property to prevent chromium leakage. Beatty Development had to puncture the cap with more than 1,000 piles to support the Exelon tower.


About Adam Bednar

Adam Bednar covers real estate and development for The Daily Record.