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For more than a year, Freddie Gray-related stories dominate coverage

The Daily Record has published more than 100 stories related to the Freddie Gray case. Here are some highlights, in chronological order: (Dates in this timeline reflect date of publication)

April 2015

April 12: Freddie Gray is arrested; police said he ran away from them unprovoked. As he is being transported in a police van, he sustains a neck injury that leaves him in critical condition. He dies April 19.

April 21: The U.S. Department of Justice begins an investigation into Gray’s death.

CHARGES DROPPED

Extended coverage by The Daily Record

Related:

Why prosecution failed | Mosby defends tactics | Lawmakers want reform | Freddie Gray changed Baltimore | Lessons of the trials | Reactions | Photos | State drops remaining charges in Freddie Gray cases

April 22: Prostesters take to the streets of Baltimore, and Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby begins her own investigation.

A protestor, left, fights with a bar patron outside of a bar near Oriole Park at Camden Yards on Saturday after a rally for Freddie Gray. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

A protestor, left, fights with a bar patron outside of a bar near Oriole Park at Camden Yards. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

April 25: Protests in Baltimore turn violent. Twelve people are arrested.

April 27: On the day of Freddie Gray’s funeral, there are riots in Baltimore.

April 28: A curfew is instituted in Baltimore. Businesses begin recovery efforts.

May 2015

Baltimore City State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby announces charges, ranging from assault to murder, against police officers in the death of Freddie Gray.

Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby announces charges, ranging from assault to murder, against police officers in the death of Freddie Gray. (The Daily Record / Maximilian Franz

May 1: On the steps of the War Memorial,  Mosby announces charges filed against six police officers: Caesar R. Goodson, Edward M. Nero, Garrett E. Miller, William Porter, Brian W. Rice and Alicia D. White. The most serious charge, second-degree depraved murder, is against Goodson. Mosby also says the arrest of Gray was itself illegal. Baltimore residents celebrate in the streets.

Early May: Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake calls for a federal investigation into the city’s police. The U.S. Department of Justice announces plans to investigate.

May 21: A Baltimore grand jury indicts the six officers.

September 2015

Sept. 2: Baltimore City Circuit Judge Barry Williams orders that the six officers be tried separately.

Sept. 9: Baltimore’s Board of Estimates approves a $6.4 million settlement with Freddie Gray’s family.

Sept. 10: Williams keeps the trials in Baltimore.

November 2015

Nov. 30: Jury selection begins for Officer William Porter’s trial.

In this courtroom sketch, Attorney Joseph Murtha, center, points to his Client, Officer William Porter, during closing arguments in the Baltimore City Circuit Courthouse. (The Daily Record/Maximilian Franz)

In this courtroom sketch, attorney Joseph Murtha, center, points to his client, Officer William Porter, during closing arguments in the Baltimore City Circuit Courthouse. (The Daily Record/Maximilian Franz)

Early December: In opening arguments, the prosecution lambastes Porter for inaction during the incident, while defense attorneys warn against rushing to judgement. Jurors get to see the van in which Freddie Gray broke his neck. Porter testifies that he would have called a medic if he thought Freddie Gray had been injured.

December 2015

Dec. 16: Porter’s trial ends in a mistrial. The jury had deliberated for three days.

January 2016

Jan. 6: Williams orders Porter to testify at another officer’s trial.

Jan. 8: Court of Special Appeals blocks the order compelling Porter’s testimony.

Jan. 20: Williams denies the prosecution’s request to compel Porter’s testimony.

February 2016

Feb. 11: Prosecutors ask the state Court of Appeals to determine whether Porter can be compelled to testify against co-defendants.

Feb. 18: The Court of Appeals puts all the Freddie Gray cases on hold so it can resolve the dispute over the testimony sought from Porter.

March 2016

Officer William Porter, center, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, leaves the Maryland Court of Appeals on Thursday, March 3, 2016, in Annapolis, Md. Maryland Court of Appeals heard the oral arguments in five cases related to the arrest and death of Freddie Gray. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Officer William Porter, center, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, leaves the Maryland Court of Appeals on Thursday, March 3, 2016, in Annapolis. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

March 3: The Court of Appeals hears arguments over whether Porter can be ordered to testify.

March 8: Maryland’s highest court sets a precedent in ruling Porter can be compelled to testify.

April 2016

April 4: Prosecutors request that Officer Garrett Miller be ordered to testify against co-defendants, testing the earlier Court of Appeals ruling.

April 20: Judge Williams rules Miller can be ordered to testify against co-defendants.

Late April: The Daily Record reports that mass arrests during rioting after the death of Freddie Gray clogged the justice system and led to police misconduct lawsuits; that federal prosecutors and investigators had been sent to Baltimore after the riots, leveling charges in the months that followed; the senior center that burned in the riots had a ceremonial opening; Baltimore’s higher education instutions use the unrest as a starting point for academic exploration of racism and disparity, as well as examining their own cultures and policies; and businesses remaining committed to Baltim0re.

May 2016

May 12: Officer Edward Nero’s bench trial begins. He is charged with second-degree assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct in office.

Officer Edward Nero leaves the court in May. (The Daily Record/Maximilian Franz)

Officer Edward Nero leaves the court in May. (The Daily Record/Maximilian Franz)

May 20: The Maryland Court of Appeals explains why prosecutors can call Officer William Porter to testify against fellow officers, despite having charges against himself.

May 23: Williams finds Officer Edward Nero not guilty.

Late May: Officer William Porter and Sgt. Alicia White sue Mosby and Maj. Sam Cogen, alleging defamation. Also, police say they will begin using web and mobile phone apps to make sure officers read and understand new rules.

June 2016

Defense team from Left- Andrew Graham; Matthew Frailing examining a witness; Officer Caesar Goodson, and Amy Askew. (Courtroom Sketch by Maximilian Franz)

Defense team from Left- Andrew Graham; Matthew Frailing examining a witness; Officer Caesar Goodson, and Amy Askew. (Courtroom Sketch by Maximilian Franz)

Early June: Officer Caesar Goodson chooses a bench trial on charges of second-degree murder, manslaughter, assault, misconduct in office and reckless endangerment. Lt. Brian Rice sues State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby and Maj. Sam Cogen of the Baltimore sheriff’s office, alleging defamation of character, false imprisonment and violation of rights.

June 9: At the start of Officer Goodson’s bench trial, Williams rebukes prosecutors for a discovery violation.

June 23:  Williams finds Goodson not guilty.

Late June: Lt. Brian Rice, Officer Garrett Miller, Sgt. Alicia White and Officer William Porter sought to have their indictments dismissed. George Washington University law professor John F. Banzhaf III files a complaint with bar counsel against Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby.

July 2016

Attorney Michael J. Belsky and his client Lt. Brian Rice seated at the motions hearing at the Baltimore City Circuit Courthouse where he elected for a bench trial in the Freddie Gray case. (The Daily Record/Maximilian Franz)

Attorney Michael J. Belsky and his client Lt. Brian Rice seated at the motions hearing at the Baltimore City Circuit Courthouse where he elected for a bench trial in the Freddie Gray case. (The Daily Record/Maximilian Franz)

July 7: Trial of Lt. Brian Rice begins with an emphasis on his role as a shift supervisor.

July 11: Williams drops a misdemeanor assault charge against Rice.

July 18: Williams finds rice Rice not guilty of manslaughter and related charges.

Mid-July : Banzhaf, the George Washington University law professor, seeks to have prosecutors in the matter disbarred. Also, internal reviews began for officers in the case.

July 27: Facing a “heavy burden” in a Kastigar hearing scheduled for Wednesday morning,  prosecutors instead decide to drop all remaining charges.

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