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Maryland art exhibit explores television’s impact on viewers

This Dec. 23, 2016, photo shows artwork titled, “Your Message,” by Jim McKay and is on display in Hagerstown, Md. The piece is part of an art exhibit at the Engine Room gallery exploring the sometimes disturbing influence of television on viewers. The exhibit runs through Saturday, Dec. 31. (Jim McKay via AP)

This Dec. 23, 2016, photo shows artwork titled, “Your Message,” by Jim McKay and is on display in Hagerstown, Md. The piece is part of an art exhibit at the Engine Room gallery exploring the sometimes disturbing influence of television on viewers. The exhibit runs through Saturday, Dec. 31. (Jim McKay via AP)

HAGERSTOWN, Md. (AP) — An art exhibit in Hagerstown explores the sometimes disturbing impact of television on viewers.

The show at the Engine Room opened this month and continues through Saturday.

One of the 10 pieces, titled “NRA Channel,” features a TV screen showing five figures firing handguns. An adjacent panel reads, “Most children will witness 18,000 murders before the age of 14.” The work is by the single-name artist DeGibnio, who has several pieces in the show.

A work by Megan Knarr, titled “Pacifier,” is a hypnotic, black-and-white painting on large flat-screen TV.

Jim McKay’s contribution is called “Your Message.” It’s an old console TV flickering with static and decorated with dolls. Painted on the screen are the words, “Doesn’t everyone get msgs.” The dolls hold signs urging viewers to keep watching.