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Hogan signs 2 bills, with 2 dozen more pending

Gov. Larry Hogan, center, signs legislation into law Friday as Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., left, and House Speaker Michael Lt. Gov. Boyd Rutherford Wednesday presented David Zimmerman, vice president of North American sales for Maersk Line, with a model of the Pride of Baltimore as an official welcome to the city. (Bryan P. Sears/The Daily Record)

Gov. Larry Hogan, center, signs legislation into law Friday as Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., left, and House Speaker Michael Lt. Gov. Boyd Rutherford Wednesday presented David Zimmerman, vice president of North American sales for Maersk Line, with a model of the Pride of Baltimore as an official welcome to the city. (Bryan P. Sears/The Daily Record)

ANNAPOLIS — Gov. Larry Hogan signed into law two more bills Friday but left two dozen others for another day.

The bill-signing ceremony came a day after the governor hastily signed an emergency bill in his office. Meanwhile, 24 other bills delivered Wednesday under the so-called six day rule await disposition.

Included in Friday’s signing event, which was listed on the governor’s public schedule, was House Bill 503, which establishes a new way of calculating non-withholding tax revenue for the purposes of budgeting.

The revenue, which includes capital gains taxes, has been the most difficult to predict and also has caused the most volatile swings in estimating revenues.

Under the bill, the state will use an average based on the most recent 10 years of capital gains collections. Should collections exceed projections, the overage must first be used to close any budget gap. After that, the surplus would be used to increase the state’s rainy day fund and for school construction and renovation projects.

The bill was supported by the governor’s budget secretary, the Office of the Comptroller and the legislature’s top fiscal analyst.

Hogan also signed House Bill 1109, which provides $20 million in funding to local governments for teacher pensions. The money is part of a deal agreed to by Hogan and the legislature in return for a state aid package for Northrop Grumman.

The fate of 24 other bills, including one piece of emergency legislation has yet to be determined. Under the six-day rule, Hogan has until Thursday to sign or reject the bills. The deadline would allow the legislature to attempt an override any veto.

Included in the set of bills before Hogan is legislation he has already vowed to veto and some that are potential veto bait.

A week ago, Hogan said he would veto House Bill 978, which would make it more difficult to turn failing schools into charter schools.

Two other bills related to federal policies were also sent to the governor Wednesday. One measure provides $1 million for the Office of the Attorney General to hire lawyers in the event that the state sues the federal government. Another creates a state panel to monitor potential changes to the Affordable Care Act and the state’s Medicaid program.

Lawmakers also sent Hogan a bill that requires state funding be used to offset any cuts in federal funding for family planning services provided by Planned Parenthood.

Amelia Chassé, a Hogan spokeswoman, said future bill signings have not yet been scheduled but would happen before Thursday’s deadline.


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