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Canton apartment proposal receives design OK

The former Snap Wall warehouse on South Linwood Street in Baltimore’s Canton neighborhood would become a five-story apartment building under a proposal approved Thursday by the city’s Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel. (Maximilian Franz/The Daily Record)

The former Snap Wall warehouse on South Linwood Street in Baltimore’s Canton neighborhood would become a five-story apartment building under a proposal approved Thursday by the city’s Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel. (Maximilian Franz/The Daily Record)

A long-gestating, mixed-use building proposed near Canton Square in Baltimore received a big boost Thursday.

Design for Taylor Property Group’s proposed building at 1000 S. Linwood St. received a recommendation for approval from the Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel.

“We look forward to this building interfacing with the community,” Ross Taylor, of Taylor Property Group, said after the hearing.

Approval of the design puts the project on course to break ground in April. The proposal calls for 24 apartments and 20 parking spots.

Design for the building, which is tentatively being called The Kanra, also includes roughly 8,000 square feet of space most likely for office use, but the potential exists for it to be broken up and used for retail.

The building will replace a former Snap Wall warehouse on the site. The design calls for a mix of material that includes a heavy amount of darker brick to blend in with exiting architecture in the area.

Plans for the building go back to at least 2014. But the project had received some opposition from the Canton community, with residents previously expressing concern about the potential impact on parking in the neighborhood as well as the height of the five-story building that will feature a roof deck.

The project is the first in the city to take advantage of the new “C-1” zoning designation, Ross said. That zoning emphasizes dense urban development without parking requirements.

Members of the panel said the potential office use may mitigate potential parking conflicts in the area that retail options may aggravate. That’s because office workers who drive to the building would be leaving the neighborhood at the time residents would be returning from work.

 

 


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