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Group raises money, hope with Greater Baltimore Walk to End Alzheimer’s

Development Director Ellen Torres, left, confers with Greater Baltimore Walk to End Alzheimer’s event co-chair and Alzheimer’s Association Baltimore chapter board member Samer Tahboub during the event at Canton Waterfront Park. Board members participated in the event and raised more than $50,000. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

Development Director Ellen Torres, left, confers with Greater Baltimore Walk to End Alzheimer’s event co-chair and Alzheimer’s Association Baltimore chapter board member Samer Tahboub during the event at Canton Waterfront Park. Board members participated in the event and raised more than $50,000. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

The 3- and 1.5-mile walks were accompanied by other fun and games at the Canton Waterfront Park as with challengers compete in a challenging game of Connect Four. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

The 3- and 1.5-mile walks were accompanied by other fun and games at the Canton Waterfront Park as with challengers compete in a challenging game of Connect Four. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

Sean Robertson, second from left, a member of the staff of the Alzheimer’s Association Washington office, gives an attendee information about the Alzheimer’s Impact Movement, the advocacy arm of the Alzheimer's Association. AIM works to advance and develop policies to overcome Alzheimer's disease through increased investment in research, enhanced care and improved support. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

Sean Robertson, second from left, a member of the staff of the Alzheimer’s Association Washington office, gives an attendee information about the Alzheimer’s Impact Movement, the advocacy arm of the Alzheimer’s Association. AIM works to advance and develop policies to overcome Alzheimer’s disease through increased investment in research, enhanced care and improved support. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

From left, event coordinator Melissa Snyder rallies her troops, including committee logistics chair Michelle Roberts, the chief operating officer at Brotman Financial, and event co-chairs Josh Brusca and Samer Tahboub. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

From left, event coordinator Melissa Snyder rallies her troops, including committee logistics chair Michelle Roberts, the chief operating officer at Brotman Financial, and event co-chairs Josh Brusca and Samer Tahboub. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

Board president Pamela Gilmour, left, participates in the Flower Garden Ceremony with other staff members by holding a purple flower in memory of her mother and grandfather and to represent others who have lost loved ones to Alzheimer’s disease. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

Board president Pamela Gilmour, left, participates in the Flower Garden Ceremony with other staff members by holding a purple flower in memory of her mother and grandfather and to represent others who have lost loved ones to Alzheimer’s disease. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

A family lets their T-shirts state why they are walking to end Alzheimer’s, honoring a loved one who passed away this year from Alzheimer’s disease. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

A family lets their T-shirts state why they are walking to end Alzheimer’s, honoring a loved one who passed away this year from Alzheimer’s disease. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

Board member Mike Ruiz, vice president and chief digital officer for MedStar Health, wears a Champion medallion at the event, signifying he raised more than $500 to help combat the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

Board member Mike Ruiz, vice president and chief digital officer for MedStar Health, wears a Champion medallion at the event, signifying he raised more than $500 to help combat the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

During the Flower Garden Ceremony, Robin Decker, center, holds a yellow flower to acknowledge her role as a caregiver to her mother Maria Borrero, right, who has Alzheimer’s disease, and was joined by her 7-year-old twin daughters. Borrero served as executive director of the Equal Opportunity Commission in the Clinton administration.  (Photo by Renee Johnson)

During the Flower Garden Ceremony, Robin Decker, center, holds a yellow flower to acknowledge her role as a caregiver to her mother Maria Borrero, right, who has Alzheimer’s disease, and was joined by her 7-year-old twin daughters. Borrero served as executive director of the Equal Opportunity Commission in the Clinton administration. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

Iris Smith, of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, holds an orange flower as an advocate for medical funding, support services and public health policies to address the projected increase of 14 million Americans with Alzheimer’s disease by the year 2050. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

Iris Smith, of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, holds an orange flower as an advocate for medical funding, support services and public health policies to address the projected increase of 14 million Americans with Alzheimer’s disease by the year 2050. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

Board secretary Jef Eyring, right, the vice president of Waverly Construction, talks to Cass Naugle, executive director of the Greater Maryland Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association, moments before her 6-year-old granddaughter Hazel Decesare raises a white flower to the crowd to symbolize the hope of finding the first survivor. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

Board secretary Jef Eyring, right, the vice president of Waverly Construction, talks to Cass Naugle, executive director of the Greater Maryland Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association, moments before her 6-year-old granddaughter Hazel Decesare raises a white flower to the crowd to symbolize the hope of finding the first survivor. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

The nearly 2,000 participants got a waterside view of Canton Waterfront Park as they wind their way around the 3-mile route during The Greater Baltimore Walk to End Alzheimer’s. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

The nearly 2,000 participants got a waterside view of Canton Waterfront Park as they wind their way around the 3-mile route during The Greater Baltimore Walk to End Alzheimer’s. (Photo by Renee Johnson)

Close to 2,000 walkers braved chilly weather Nov. 10 at Canton Waterfront Park to participate in The Greater Baltimore Walk to End Alzheimer’s.

The participants walked the 3-mile and 1.5-mile courses to help raise money for the Greater Maryland Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association. The walk was the last of six walks held throughout the Baltimore region and has helped raise nearly $381,000 of its target of $427,000. Proceeds raised will help support the more than 110,000 Maryland families who have a member living with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.

A number of the walkers were also caregivers to those stricken with the disease. There are 16 million Americans that provide unpaid care for the 5.7 million people with Alzheimer’s or other dementias in the U.S. Caregivers provide 18.4 billion hours of care valued at more than $232 billion.

November is National Alzheimer’s Disease Month and National Family Caregiver’s Month.

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