Quantcast

Dr. Adam Rosenblatt and Georgia Rosenblatt | UM UCH

Adam Rosenblatt, MD was named director of geriatric psychiatry and Georgia Rosenblatt, MS, APRN, PMHCNS-BC the administrative director of substance use services with University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health.

Head Shots photographed for University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health System by MidAtlantic Photographic LLC and Robin Sommer

As director of geriatric psychiatry, Adam Rosenblatt provides treatment and counseling to the Department of Behavioral Health’s inpatients and outpatients, with a focus on those suffering the related effects of aging.  Prior to UM UCH, Rosenblatt served in various positions at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, including director of geropsychiatry, professor of psychiatry and neurology, co-director of the Huntington’s Disease Program and supervising psychiatrist at the Center for Advanced Healthcare. He also has served in a variety psychiatry and geriatric psychiatry roles at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He holds a medical degree from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and a bachelor’s degree from Yale University. His psychiatric residency took place at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He is certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology.

Head Shots photographed for University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health System by MidAtlantic Photographic LLC and Robin Sommer

As administrative director of substance use services, Georgia Rosenblatt connects and coordinates with the wide array of public and private substance use services in Harford County. In addition, she educates providers, staff and the community on substance use disorders including identification and management of the disease and provides referrals to the most appropriate treatment for the individual seeking care.  Prior to her arrival at UM UCH, Rosenblatt served as a nurse clinician in substance abuse services and adult psychiatry with the Virginia Commonwealth University Health System; as a clinical case manager and clinical nurse at Johns Hopkins Hospital; as a faculty instructor at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing; and nurse manager of addiction treatment services at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She holds a Master of Science in nursing from the University of Maryland and a Bachelor of Science in nursing from Salisbury University.

To purchase a reprint of this article, contact reprints@thedailyrecord.com.

One comment

  1. Very good CME on HD on youtube, Thank you! I read a book on a local murder many years ago (1897) here in Michigan, “To Hell I Must Go” by Rod Sadler, which I think describes a young woman burdened with Juvenile onset HD. The murder was strangely bizarre and gory, even for murder, and of course, it becomes a great “ghost story”. But this woman was a real person whose life was quite miserable, and the author relates details found in the actual casefiles that I think are suspicious of HD: a childhood that included being “slow”, seizures, loss of three children to adoption from family pressure due to perceived inability for her to parent appropriately, and delusions of communicating with her deceased mother ( interestingly probably deceased in the same local lunatic asylum where the young woman herself died). I believe I have found her daughter and grand daughter dying in mental health facilities as well ( family history research experience). I thought this book may interest you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*