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Chasen set to introduce butler app at Baltimore apartments

Chasen Construction expects to introduce the butler app Hello Alfred at four of its boutique luxury apartments, like the one pictured, in February. (Submitted photo by Lauren Daue)

Chasen Construction expects to introduce the butler app Hello Alfred at four of its boutique luxury apartments, like the one pictured, in February. (Submitted photo by Lauren Daue)

Chasen Construction and Development expects to introduce butler app Hello Alfred to four of its Baltimore apartment buildings in February.

Residents in designated units will have access to the use of the app, which is included in the price of rent, to schedule services, such as a hotel-style turndown service, a pantry stocking amenity and dry cleaning assistance.

“Partnering with an innovator like Hello Alfred was a no-brainer for us. We are constantly looking for new, cutting edge ways to make our buildings stand out by enhancing the living experience for our residents. As our lives get more full and hectic, it’s nice to be able to offer a service that can alleviate some of those day-to-day tasks we all deal with,” Brandon Chasen, CEO of Chasen Construction and Development, said in a statement.

Chasen, which specializes in turning formerly dilapidated buildings into boutique luxury-apartments, is one of the first in the Baltimore area to introduce the service. The company plans to introduce Hello Alfred at its The Wilkes, The Darcy, The Courtland and The Roland properties.

Currently Chasen Development has seven apartment buildings with 90 units in Baltimore. The firm has six more projects in the pipeline with four buildings, with 96 units, expected to deliver in 2020.

In recent years, luxury apartment builders have focused on adding amenities to the buildings in an increasingly competitive market. Buildings are generally targeting younger professionals who want an urban lifestyle, focused on work who feel they don’t have time for various tasks like grocery shopping.

Apartments were once viewed as the entry level residence before moving into a condo, and eventually a single-family home. The level of conveniences offered at apartment buildings have reached a level that they’ve squeezed demand for condos, and in many cases helped residents put off buying a home altogether.


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