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Md.’s Patriot Spaces helps medical field with COVID-19 battle

Matt Timbario, founder and co-owner of Patriot, is shipping storage containers that have been converted for use as medical stations or other related applications to hospitals in Maryland, Ohio and California. (PRNewswire/Patriot)

Matt Timbario, founder and co-owner of Patriot, is shipping storage containers that have been converted for use as medical stations or other related applications to hospitals in Maryland, Ohio and California. (PRNewswire/Patriot)

Dunkirk-based Patriot Spaces is shipping storage containers that have been converted for use as medical stations or other related applications to hospitals in Maryland, Ohio and California to help meet the growing need for hospital and testing facilities because of the resurgence of COVID-19

Two of the units were sent to Johns Hopkins University for satellite locations in Lutherville, four were sent UCLA hospitals in Los Angeles and two to the University Health Hospitals in Cleveland.

The units feature important improvements to the six prototypes that were delivered in April to the Untied Medical Center in Washington under a contract with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The upgrades include enhanced functionality, portability, maintainability and safety. The containers measure 16 feet long, 8 feet wide and 8 feet high and have a lifespan of 40 to 50 years. The converted units range in cost from $20,000 to $25,000 depending on customization.

The six prototype units were designed to be located inside tents, with all of the mechanical and electrical equipment placed on the outside of the unit. The new units are fabricated to be fully exposed to the elements. An equipment room has been created within the unit and all mechanical and electrical equipment has been placed with in that room. These units are also being provided with hand wash sinks with fresh and gray water holding tanks.

The units that will be delivered to UCLA this week have been redesigned to include fully insulated walls and ceiling with finished interiors lined with wipeable interior walls, ceiling and flooring for sterilization. The insulated walls were required to maintain temperature control in the intense heat of Los Angeles.

Unlike the units at the United Medical Center which were designed to be used for inpatient COVID positive patients, the new units are intended for outpatient treatment units.

The new units feature the following major improvements:

An interior wall with a 112 cubic foot compartment that will enable repairs, modifications/upgrades of equipment and electric systems to be performed from outside the unit via a panel or door; this will eliminate the need to disturb or inconvenience a patient if the equipment needs to be accessed by a technician.

All mechanical/electrical equipment is bolted to the floor inside the unit. This will ensure the equipment cannot be damaged if the unit is struck from the outside, guarantees the unit is more secure when transported and is protected from outside elements, and increases the lifespan of the equipment

Since all exterior mounted equipment is mounted inside the units, the overall exterior length is smaller, making them easier to transport. They can be moved using delivery and transportation vehicles and logistics system, thereby reducing costs and simplifying logistics.

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