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ACS leadership tours future site of new Baltimore Hope Lodge

From left, Stuart S. Martin, Ph.D., Jamie McCann and Barbara Taylor talk about the campaign at the Capital Grille. (Photo courtesy of American Cancer Society Baltimore)

Alden S. Bradstock III, PE, and Dara Heidt pose for a photo at the Capital Grille. (Photo courtesy of American Cancer Society Baltimore)

Roland Selby and Tswana Sewell enjoy a conversation at the Capital Grille. (Photo courtesy of American Cancer Society Baltimore)

From left, Mary-Lou Strohman, Michel L. Modell, Margaret Beck and Dawn Pappas talk about the importance of the communal kitchen at Hope Lodge. (Photo courtesy of American Cancer Society Baltimore)

Margaret Bell, left, and Dawne Pappas talk about redesigning the old patient rooms in the future Baltimore Hope Lodge. (Photo courtesy of American Cancer Society Baltimore)

From left, Stuart S. Martin Ph.D., Roland R. Selby Jr., Angela Butler and Daryl Taylor get together in the kitchen that will be remodeled for the new Baltimore Hope Lodge. (Photo courtesy of American Cancer Society Baltimore)

From left, Daryl Taylor, Fred Fried and Alden S. Bradstock III PE chat at the reception area of the present Hope Lodge, which had to close during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo courtesy of American Cancer Society Baltimore)

Local leadership from the American Cancer Society Baltimore took a tour of the building that will ultimately become the future, larger Baltimore Hope Lodge, a free home away from home for cancer patients and their caregivers.

The new space, which is across the street from the present Hope Lodge at 636 W. Lexington St., allows the lodge to expand from its original 26 patient guest rooms when it opened in 1987 to 34 rooms and update to a state-of-the-art redesign.  A capital campaign to fund the new facility is about to launch with a  $10 million goal.  The building is being provided by the University of Maryland.

There are 30 Hope Lodges across the country featuring guest rooms for a patient with one caregiver, a common room, communal kitchen, dining room, laundry room, game and fitness rooms, outdoor space and more.  The larger Baltimore Hope Lodge will offer an additional 2,920 room nights to cancer patients and caregivers annually, helping to reduce disparities in cancer outcomes by providing free lodging to alleviate financial hardship and stressful travel so that patients can focus on getting better.

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