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Author Archives: Laslo Boyd

Laslo Boyd: Why strong mayors are important

Big city mayors have been much in the news this year. The end of Michael Bloomberg’s 12 years as mayor of New York City has drawn stories describing the many changes that he brought to that city, from major development projects to bike sharing to policing tactics to the recovery from 9/11.

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Laslo Boyd: Biggest glitches not with Obamacare

Last week was a big one for the law sometimes referred to as the Affordable Care Act. On Oct. 1, citizens began signing up for health care coverage under the new law. Despite some glitches on the websites that were supposed to make the process an easy one, initial indications showed a lot of demand for the program.

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Laslo Boyd: Higher education’s broken financial model

President Obama caused quite a stir in higher education circles recently when he announced that he wants to create a system for rating colleges on which ones provide consumers with the best value. The underlying motivation for his suggestion is a serious one that should provoke more than the reflex responses that you so often hear when anyone raises questions about the cost of college attendance.

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Laslo Boyd: So you think being a university president is easy?

It’s true that many of them are quite well-paid. And the job often comes with some nice perks, including a house and a car. Many university presidents are important and influential members of their communities. And whether the sports teams are any good or not, they are guaranteed really good seats, often in a presidential box.

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Laslo Boyd: What’s next for Coppin State?

Last month, a special review committee appointed by the University System of Maryland and chaired by UMBC president Freeman A. Hrabowski III issued a report that offered a frank and highly disturbing assessment of Coppin State University. The committee, which included four members of the state legislature, two USM regents and six representatives from the Coppin community, did something incredibly rare in higher education. It examined data and facts and used those rather than any preconceived notions or political stances to reach conclusions.

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