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Author Archives: Lawyers USA

Arbitration ruling divides litigation bar, spurs calls to Congress

The chasm between corporate-defense attorneys who extol the virtues of mandatory arbitration agreements and members of the plaintiffs’ bar who say the pacts strip consumers of their right to redress was widened by the U.S. Supreme Court last month.

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Court strikes down DOMA, nixes Prop 8 appeal

In a ruling that will have an immediate effect on more than 1,000 federal laws and programs, the Supreme Court on Wednesday struck down the Defense of Marriage Act, holding that the law prohibiting recognition of state-sanctioned same-sex marriages for federal purposes unconstitutionally violates equal protection principles.

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Justices give school another shot in affirmative action case

Giving the University of Texas at Austin another chance to prove that its affirmative action program passes constitutional muster, the U.S Supreme Court held Monday that schools must prove that admissions policies considering race among other factors must be strictly tailored to the purpose of diversity.

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Supreme Court sides with employers on retaliation suits

Workers who allege that their employer retaliated against them must meet a higher burden than merely showing that the desire to retaliate was one motivating factor, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled in a 5-4 decision that vacates a $3.4 million jury verdict.

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Supreme Court’s ‘Miranda’ ruling leaves lawyers guessing

The U.S. Supreme Court’s splintered ruling allowing a witness’ pre-arrest silence to be introduced at trial — its latest decision carving out more of the contours of defendants’ well-known right to remain silent — seemed at first blush to be a devastating blow to defense attorneys and their clients.

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Supreme Court: Lawyers can’t use license info to get clients

High school students from Austin, Minn., visit the Supreme Court on Monday in anticipation of key decisions being announced.

The litigation exception to a federal privacy law did not allow four trial attorneys to obtain the personal information of drivers for the “predominant purpose” of soliciting new clients for consumer lawsuits, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday.

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