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Local REIT Being Sold

<TAB>Bethesda-based First Washington Realty Trust Inc. will be bought by U.S. Retail Partners, a California real-estate joint venture, for $800 million, a deal that expands the buyer

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Marijuana Use on Western Ballots

<TAB>CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) Marijuana is on the ballot across the West this fall, from proposals to allow its medicinal use in Colorado and Nevada to measures that would let it flourish in Alaska and the pot-growing

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Executive Courses Are Slow to Fill Up

<TAB>The University of Maryland University College has revamped its professional development program to offer more technical training to corporate executives, but classes are not filling up as quickly as had been envisioned.<@SM><@SM><TAB>Pat Spencer, interim dean of the UMUC

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Hot Shot: Jon Laria

<TAB>No one ever thinks of a real estate lawyer as being an active community server; however, Jon Laria is trying to break that image.<@SM><@SM><TAB>Laria, an attorney active in the Baltimore community, has been named partner in the law office of Ballard Spahr Andrews & Ingersoll, LLP. Since joining the firm in 1995, Laria has worked in the real estate department, practicing in such areas as real estate acquisition, development and finance and administrative law.

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Small-Business Law: Protect Your Business Ideas

In the past, business people and attorneys in other practice areas rarely encountered intellectual property (IP) law, which includes patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade-secret rights. More recently though, these issues arise often, especially in the context of e-commerce. Recognizing when IP issues occur can help a company avoid losing valuable rights. <@SM><@SM> <TAB>Business people are usually most familiar with tangible property such as real estate, equipment and inventory. Intellectual property may be less known but is often the most valuable asset to a modern company. Like tangible property, IP can be appraised, used as collateral for a loan or be sold.

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Government Wins Two, Loses Two

<TAB>A federal judge on yesterday gave the government the go-ahead to pursue federal racketeering claims against tobacco makers, but limited how much leeway it will have in its effort to recover billions from the industry.<@SM><@SM><TAB>In a ruling praised by both the government and the tobacco industry, U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler ruled the government could pursue federal racketeering claims but could not invoke the Medical Care Recovery Act or the Federal Employees Health Benefits Act to recover Medicare expenses related to ill smokers.

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