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Tag Archives: Jack L.B. Gohn

Every one of them white

Jack LB Gohn

“Enjoy glimpses reminiscent of traditional holidays gone by with this highly detailed Holiday Village Set,” says the ad copy on the Costco website. For $99.99, Costco will sell you an assemblage of models of various snow-topped buildings, a skating rink, ...

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Harassers as comeback kids?

Jack LB Gohn

As the outing of sexual harassers continues to bring down powerful and formerly admired men (it is almost always men), the question whether we give them second acts is bound to grow. It’s not a simple question.

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There are tides

Jack LB Gohn

A columnist must write concisely. Concision forced me to omit much from my previous column, in which I discussed the mechanics of white privilege. I got to tell readers privilege can be rolled along from one generation to another, as ...

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Jack L.B. Gohn: The Gansler photo and teen drinking

The picture of Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler in the midst of a beach house party full of clearly inebriated just-graduated high school seniors has drawn national attention and provoked national amusement, including a mention on Leno.

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Jack L.B. Gohn: Our metadata, ourselves

Sen. John McCain recently expressed surprise that young people see Edward Snowden as a hero. It’s surprising he’s surprised. When, thanks almost exclusively to Snowden, we have learned of the existence of huge government programs that impinge drastically upon everyone’s privacy (in their Internet communications, their telephone calls, their mail and their own computers), and we see the price Snowden has had to pay, is it any wonder there are people who think of him as a hero?

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Jack Gohn: Command influence at the end of a rope

On Nov. 22, 1944, the United States Army hanged Privates Arthur Davis and Charles Jordan for the crime of rape. They were likely not guilty. But they were African American. What happened to them happened to many others, their real transgression being soldiering while black, in a racist army, in a racist part of France. Mary Louise Roberts, who teaches history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has put before us Davis’ and Jordan’s story and those of many of their compatriots, in her recent book, “What Soldiers Do.”

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