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The Lesson: Discriminate quietly

There’s been some activity in the case of the Muslim woman whose foster care application was denied. If you want the backstory, check out my first blog post: Turning down a helping hand. In a nutshell: Tashima Crudup, a Muslim, enrolled with Contemporary Family Services (CFS) to become a foster care parent. She was in foster care for a time as a child, and she wanted to help others the way she herself had once been helped. CFS is a private agency licensed by the state to help train and approve foster parents. After completing the fifty-hour-plus training course, Ms. Crudup’s application was denied because her religious beliefs prohibit pork products in her home. Note that Ms. Crudup would not prohibit her foster children from eating pork products anywhere else in the world (ballgame, movie theater, friends’ houses, etc…). Furthermore, Ms. Crudup pledged to help children placed in her care observe their own religious beliefs. The ACLU of Maryland got involved, and helped Ms. Crudup file a complaint with the Baltimore City Community Relations Commission. That got the ball rolling, and the state has now twice cited CFC regarding their discrimination against Ms. Crudup. The state gets an A+ for quick action.

5 comments

  1. I’m still not convinced. Children with ODD are tough placements and it sounds like that’s what CFS was primarily concerned about. An explicit prohibition of something like pork could be fertile ground for rebellion in such a child. If he knows he’s not allowed to have it, he brings it home again and again and basically sets the placement up for failure. Honestly I can see CFS’ point.

  2. Nefertari barnes

    It is silly to tell the head of the household what her family should cook in her pots. Would this rule hold with a mother who’s family eats kosher products??? I absolutely cannot see their point.

  3. Well, technically they’re not telling her what she can cook in her pots. She’s free to cook whatever she likes so long as she’s not interested in fostering a special needs child.

  4. This is ridiculous. I’m familiar with this agency and they have very discriminatory and unethical business practices. Thy have no business denying parents due to their religious preference when they allow foster parents who are living public housing and senior citizen homes.

  5. This is ridiculous. I’m familiar with this agency and they have very discriminatory and unethical business practices. They have no business denying parents due to their religious preference when they allow foster parents who are living public housing and senior citizen homes.